Ontario Curriculum Connections

Ministry of Education of Ontario - For Educators/Teachers

The following are some of the connections between the subject matter and presentation style of the "Crime and Punishment" and "Ghosts and the Gallows" tours and the Ontario provincial curriculum. The links are focused in the areas of history, law, politics, English and drama, but it is likely that there are links in other subjects as well.


Follow the links below for further information:

Grade 7 - 10, English Grade 7, History Grade 8, History Grade 9, Drama
Grade 10, Civics (CHV2O) Grade 11, Understanding Canadian Law Grade 11, Canadian Politics and Citizenship, (Open (CPC3O)) Grade 11, English
Grade 12, Canadian and International Law, (University Preparation (CLN4U)) Grade 12, English    


Grade 7 - 10, English
  • critical listening skills
  • ask questions to clarify
  • identify non-verbal communication techniques
  • listen attentively
  • identify the characteristics of different types of speech
  • demonstrate the ability to concentrate by identifying main points and staying on topic
  • explain how oral communication skills can contribute to success in all curriculum areas and the world outside the school
  • analyze their own and other's oral presentations to identify strengths and weaknesses
  • use listening techniques and oral communication skills to participate in group discussions
  • use techniques of effective listening and demonstrate an understanding of oral presentations by restating the main ideas presented and identifying the strengths and weaknesses of presentations
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Grade 7, History
  • Understand the significance of the War of 1812 for Canadian-American relations
  • Understand everyday life in English Canada (e.g. economic and social life)
  • Describe the impact of the War of 1812 on the development of Canada (e.g. the building of fortifications, the Rideau Canal, movement of the capital to Ottawa)
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Grade 8, History
  1. Confederation:

    • identify external and internal factors leading to Confederation (e.g., political deadlock, inter-colonial trade, reciprocity, Corn Laws, Fenians, Manifest Destiny, transportation, defense)
    • demonstrate an understanding of the social, political, and economic make-up of the British North American colonies in the 1860's
    • use a variety of primary and secondary sources to locate relevant information about the regional interests of each colony/ province before and after joining the Dominion of Canada (e.g., primary sources: artifacts, journals, letters, statistics, field trips, period documents and maps; secondary sources: maps, illustrations, print materials, videos, CD-ROMs, Internet sites)
    • demonstrate and understand the roles of key individuals (e.g. George-Etienne Cartier, John A. MacDonald) and main events leading to Confederation (e.g. Charlottetown, Québec, and London Conferences; coalition government in the Canadas)
    • Formulate questions to facilitate research on issues and problems (e.g. the contrasting points of view of various individuals and groups regarding Confederation)

  2. Canada - A changing society:

    • compare living and working conditions, technological developments, and social roles near the beginning of the twentieth century with similar aspects of life in present-day Canada
    • describe the factors contributing to change in Canadian society (e.g., immigration, technology, politics, globalization)
    • analyze and describe the conflicts and changes involving Canadians from Confederation to 1918
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Grade 9 Drama
  • demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles of dramatic expression (e.g. voice, movement, production values)
  • identify and describe a variety of dramatic forms (e.g. tableau, storytelling, improvisation)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the control of volume, tone, pace, and intention in expressive speech
  • identify and apply principles of listening (e.g. eye contact, focus, non-verbal cues and responses, paraphrasing) both in and out of role
  • describe the various kinds of learning (e.g. social, personal, artistic, deepened understanding of content) made possible through drama
  • identify the characteristics of a receptive, discriminating audience (e.g. engagement, listening, focus)
  • identify personal skills and qualities developed through engagement in the dramatic arts (e.g. negotiation, spontaneity, overcoming inhibition)
  • demonstrate an understanding of how these skills may be applied in academic and personal life (e.g. career possibilities)
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Grade 10, Civics (CHV2O)

Rights and Responsibilities of Canadian Citizenship
  • explain why it is essential in a democracy for governments to be open and accountable to their citizens, while protecting the personal information citizens are required to provide to government (e.g. Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.)
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how the judicial system (e.g. law courts, trials, juries) protects the rights of both individuals and society (e.g. the rights of the accused, the rights of the victim, and the role of the judiciary).
  • describe a case in which a citizen's rights and responsibilities have been upheld or restricted, outlining the concerns and actions of involved citizens and the reasons for the eventual outcome.
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Grade 11, Understanding Canadian Law

University/College Preparation
  • assess the contributions to contemporary Canadian law of early legal systems
  • describe key developments in English common law and explain their influence on Canadian law
  • describe the processes, legal institutions, and methods involved in bringing a criminal case to trial and in resolving it
  • analyze the purposes of sentencing, including those relating to alternative methods of imposing sanctions or regulating behavior
  • describe the main purposes of sentencing (e.g., punishment, deterrence, society's protection, reintegration)
  • explain the various sentencing options available, including alternative options (e.g., peer sentencing, victim-offender programs)
  • analyze the role of victims and victim impact statements in sentencing; explain the role of the prison system
  • compile summary notes in a variety of forms and for a variety of purposes (e.g., research and preparation for debates, oral presentations, mock trials, tests, examinations)

Workplace preparation
  • describe the criminal trial process
  • identify the sentencing options available to judges in a criminal trial or a provincial prosecution
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Grade 11, Canadian Politics and Citizenship, (Open (CPC3O))
  • draw appropriate conclusions, based on analysis (e.g., taking into account chronology, cause and effect, similarities and differences), about political events, issues, and trends and their relationship to social, economic, and cultural systems
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Grade 12, Canadian and International Law, (University Preparation (CLN4U))
  • explain the interrelation of law, morality, and religion
  • analyse how society uses law to express its values
  • analyse contemporary events and issues that demonstrate a possible conflict between the law and societal values
  • evaluate the political and legal avenues available for resolving conflicts (e.g., the courts, tribunals, legislation, referendums)
  • compile summary notes in a variety of forms and for a variety of purposes (e.g., research and preparation for debates, oral presentations, mock trials, tests, examinations)
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Grade 11, English

University Preparation:
  • communicate orally in large and small groups for a variety of purposes, with a focus on listening for main ideas and significant supporting details; clarifying and extending the ideas of others; using appropriate academic and theoretical language
  • use critical listening skills to analyse the content of oral presentations (e.g. assess the validity and persuasiveness of explicit and implicit arguments and the truth of conclusions; make inferences and detect assumptions, omissions, and biases; write a synopsis or review using criteria such as coherence, relevance, and logic)
  • analyse elements of oral presentations and assess how effectively they are used (e.g. transition words and phrases, level of language, body language, handouts, visual aids and opportunities to clarify information or answer questions)
  • compare their current oral communication knowledge and skills with those required in a variety of occupations and university programs and make an action plan to address identified needs

College Preparation:
  • use critical listening skills to analyse the content of oral presentations (e.g. write accurate summaries of main ideas and supporting details; assess the relevance of evidence, the validity of arguments, and the truth of conclusions)
  • compare their current oral communication knowledge and skills with those required in a variety of occupations and college programs and make an action plan to address identified needs

Workplace Preparation:
  • use listening techniques and oral communication skills to participate in classroom discussions and more formal activities, with a focus on using specialized language appropriately in oral reports, role-playing, and other presentations
  • use critical listening skills to understand the content of oral communications (e.g. listen for main ideas and supporting details, follow oral instructions accurately, ask questions to confirm understanding, write accurate summaries and messages)

Presentation and Speaking Skills - Open:
    Preparing Presentations:

  • identify and analyse the characteristics of effective presentations
  • plan presentations for specific purposes and audiences
  • identify a range of presentation forms (e.g. oral reports, speeches, lectures, debates, public address announcements, panel discussions, book talks, storytelling, recitations, role-playing, seminars, sales presentations, interviews and multi-media presentations)
  • analyse the use of rhetorical and stylistic devices in oral presentations (e.g. explain how the use of climactic order heightens the impact of a speech, explain why the use of repetition for emphasis is an effective strategy in a debate)
  • explain the techniques effective speakers use to make presentations (e.g. explain the importance of volume, pace of speech, pitch, tone of voice, eye contact, facial expression, posture, dress, movement and gesture in effective presentations)
  • select an appropriate oral presentation form for a specific purpose and audience (e.g. plan a storytelling session to entertain an elementary class)
  • analyse the context and the needs of the audience when planning an oral presentation
  • select relevant and significant information from research to suit the purpose and audience



  • Making Presentations:

  • communicate orally for a variety of specific audiences, using the forms, language and techniques of effective oral presentations
  • make presentations in a variety of forms for various purposes and audiences
  • use appropriate and effective language in oral presentations
  • use appropriate techniques in oral presentations (e.g. vary volume, pitch and inflection for emphasis and to maintain audience interest in an oral report)
  • monitor audience reactions during a presentation and adapt delivery accordingly (e.g. ask questions to check audience understanding and engagement, rephrase main ideas for clarification, speed up delivery to recapture the attention of a restless audience, add humour to reinforce and emphasize key points, respond quickly, confidently and appropriately to unexpected digressions, interruptions or questions during the presentation)
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Grade 12, English

University Preparation:
  • use critical listening skills to analyse and assess the content of oral presentations (e.g. assess the validity of the presenter's sources, arguments, and conclusions, detect assumptions, and omissions and provide missing information)
  • use effective strategies, such as researching information and ideas, organizing, rehearsing and revising, to plan and present seminars, debates, and independent study projects
  • use techniques for making effective oral presentations, with a focus on organizing material coherently, providing significant evidence, using imagery, analogy and parallel structures, and incorporating participatory activities, visual aids and technology
College Preparation:
  • communicate orally for a variety of purposes, with a focus on extending information and ideas; exploring possibilities; drawing conclusions;
  • use critical listening skills to analyse and assess the content of oral presentations (e.g. detect assumptions, omissions, and perspectives; assess the validity of the arguments, evidence, and conclusions, ask questions to extend understanding)
  • plan and deliver oral presentations and conduct interviews, with a focus on researching information and ideas, organizing, rehearsing and revising
Workplace Preparation:
  • use critical listening skills to understand the content of oral communications (e.g. note the order in which information and examples are presented, ask questions to extend understanding and explore alternatives)
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Today's Tours
Ottawa
Kingston
Toronto
Saturday
Sep 20th
Today's Tours
Ottawa
Kingston
Toronto
Saturday
Sep 20th
Today's Tours
Ottawa
Kingston
Toronto
Saturday
Sep 20th
Tonight's Schedule:

.........
8:00pm:
Ghosts and Spirits of Old Town
.........
8:00pm:
Fantômes et esprits de la vieille ville
.........
9:00pm:
Toronto's Haunted Walk
.........